EVENTS, GENDER POLITICS, Uncategorized

The first Global Feminist LBQ Women*s Conference will take place from 6-9 July 2019 in South Africa.

The first Global Feminist LBQ Women*s Conference will take place from 6-9 July 2019 in South Africa. Apply here by 1 September

The conference is being organized by a collective working group of 22 LBQ women* activists from across all regions of the world. It aims to create a space for activists & advocates to come together, share knowledge, exchange strategies, strengthen connections, mobilize resources, and take the lead in building a global LBQ women*s movement with the capacity to influence the world agenda on human rights, health and development. We hope to bring together 500 participants from around the world.

We will be launching the conference website soon. If you have any questions, please email the organizing team at: lbqwomenglobalconference@gmail.com. We will do our best to respond as soon as possible.

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GENDER POLITICS

The real numbers on sexual offences — Rape Crisis Cape Town Blog

A piece published by Rape Crisis Cape Town today points to the scary realities around reporting rapes and the likelihood of a conviction. Less than 1% of sexual offences result in justice for the victims. Follow the link to their website below for the full piece.

In South Africa less than 1% of sexual offences result in justice for the victims of these crimes. The estimated number of sexual offences in South Africa is 645 580 each year and only one in 13 of these sexual offences are reported to the police. In other words, only 7,7% of sexual offences that […]

via The real numbers on sexual offences — Rape Crisis Cape Town Blog

BOOKS, EVENTS, GENDER POLITICS, Uncategorized

Feminism Is events at the Open Book Festival 2018

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This year’s Open Book Festival in Cape Town has, as usual, an amazing line up of writers and public intellectuals coming together to talk about literature, politics, and many other things. The festival takes place from 5 – 9 September in Cape Town.

This year the Open Book Festival team has given amazing support to Feminism Is, and has five events scheduled around the book, as well as many others with a feminist focus.

5 September
20.00 – 21.00 Feminism Is: Pumla Gqola, Dela Gwala and Thembekile Mahlaba explore their journeys to feminism and answer FAQs in the company of Sara-Jayne King Fugard Studio

GET TICKETS

6 September
16.00 – 17.30 Feminism Is: Listening Room: We invite all persons of trans experience and/or those who identify as women/womxn to share personal experiences that shape their feminist identities in a safe and respectful space. Please keep contributions to a maximum of 5 minutes to allow as many voices to be heard as possible. Hosted by Joy Watson with contributions from Janine Adams, Kit Beukes, Michelle Hattingh and Ming-Cheau Lin and Tshepiso Mashinini. Fugard Studio

RSVP

7 September
14.00 – 15.00 Feminism Is: Body Politics: Anna Dahlqvist, Melanie Judge and Tlaleng Mofokeng speak to Joy Watson about taking control in the context of patriarchy Fugard Theatre

GET TICKETS

7 September
18.00 – 19.00 Feminism Is: Talking Feminism: B Camminga, Helen Moffett and Tlaleng Mofokeng explore divisions and how they can stand in the way of feminist conversations in the company of Yaliwe Clarke Fugard Theatre

GET TICKETS

9 September
12.00 – 13.00 Feminism Is: Reflections: Jen Thorpe wraps up the series of ‘Feminism Is’ events and asks Pumla Gqola, Haji Mohamed Dawjee and Nwabisa Mda to share their thoughts on SA feminism today Fugard Theatre

GET TICKETS

Check out the full programme here for more details on other amazing feminist events.

BUSINESS/FINANCE, GENDER POLITICS

Why you should cut “just” out of your emails

pomegranite logo jpeg.JPGBy Liz Fletcher of Pomegranite

Have you noticed how often you use the word “just” in a professional context, particularly emails? I’ve been thinking about why I use it so much in tricky situations and if it’s something that women use more than men.

I often find myself using it when I feel like I’m being annoying to a client (while I’m trying to do my job), for example, “I just wanted to check in with you about…” or “I’m just following up on…”. It makes the sentence feel like a smaller inconvenience, like what I’m really saying is “I’m sliding this tiny little thing it into your stack of to-dos but it’s not a big deal” while batting my eyelashes.

Using “just” helps to make me feel like I’m less of a nuisance. But I’m doing my job, so why should I want to feel like this? While it might seem like “just” smooths the path for requests, it also makes us appear small; it diminishes respect for our work and ourselves. Why shouldn’t we take up as much space in someone’s to-do list as anything else?

Compare the same phrases without “just”: “I’d like to check in with you about…” and “I’m following up on…”. Do you hear how much more clear and direct the requests are? It’s as if you’ve sat up straight while asking. That’s what a professional relationship should be.

Ellen Leanse, a former Google executive wrote a 2015 LinkedIn blog about the word “just”, when she noticed women (including herself) using it way more than men, and how she tackled it in her office. She began to notice that “just” wasn’t about being polite,

“it was a subtle message of subordination, of deference. Sometimes it was self-effacing. Sometimes even duplicitous. As I started really listening, I realized that striking it from a phrase almost always clarified and strengthened the message.”

Try this experiment, which we also did in our team. Search or read through your emails for the next couple of days and count the number of times “just” appears. Notice why you used it and how it changes the tone when you remove it. We were astounded by how often we use it and have committed to clarity and confidence by removing it.

IMG_8110Liz Fletcher is the co-owner of Pomegranite, a boutique online presence consultancy which she set up with her business partner Sarah Gurney, in 2013. The pair met studying English literature together at Rhodes University and grew the business through developing thoughtful storytelling on digital platforms.

The Pomegranite offices in Cape Town and Joburg service clients which are predominantly in the SME, NGO and education sectors.

Liz gets a kick out of bringing the magic out in her team and developing systems and plans that help the business run smoothly.

EVENTS, GENDER POLITICS, LAW

Event: Developing Court Models in South Africa

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The Centre for Law and Society (UCT) in partnership with the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign takes great pleasure in inviting you to the panel on Developing Relevant Models for Specialised Sexual Offences Courts in South Africa.
The event will be presented under the CLS Hub, which aims to offer supportive spaces for engaged debates around critical socio-legal issues, and regularly hosts events, targeted at students, activists, academics and legal practitioners, that engage with critical issues in law and society.
The panelists will be Lisa Vetten (WITS City Institute), Aisling Heath (Gender Health and Justice Research Unit, UCT) and Karen Hollely (The Child Witness Institute). They will be presenting a summary of findings from their recent research on the sexual offences courts for an audience in which stakeholders from within the criminal justice system will be invited to play an active role when it comes to question time. The audience will also comprise Western Cape based NGO partners and activists as well as students and academics.
The event details are as follows:
Date: 26 April 2018
Time: 5:30 for 6:00 pm
Venue: Kramer Lecture Theatre 2, Level 2, Wilfred and Jules Kramer Law Building
Register for free and RSVP for catering at pbl-cls@uct.ac.za.