We need feminism more than ever – write for us!

Feminists South Africa is back, and we need your writing to make us aware of issues of importance in your heart, in your homes, and in our country. Send it all through to feministssa@gmail.com Let's hear those voices, even if they shake.

Advertisements

Female State of the Nation: Part 4: Crime and Human Rights

By Jen Thorpe Read Part 1 'Where are We', Part 2 'Women and the Economy', Part 3: 'Energy and the Environment' As South Africans it seems that it is impossible to go a day without seeing a news headline of a violent attack in some form. Between 2006 and 2013, more than one million crimes … Continue reading Female State of the Nation: Part 4: Crime and Human Rights

Female State of the Nation: Part 3: Energy and the Environment

By Jen Thorpe Read Part 1 – ‘Where are we’ here, and Part 2 ‘Women and the economy’ here It seems important that I’m sitting in my living room in the dark during load-shedding trying to finish this portion of the SONA analysis on the environment and energy. It couldn’t be much clearer to me that the … Continue reading Female State of the Nation: Part 3: Energy and the Environment

Female State of the Nation: Part 1: Where are we?

By Jen Thorpe This State of the Nation is one that asks you, for a few moments, to consider to some information about the majority of South Africans. Some information about the biggest population group that is not a racial or religious group. This State of the Nation asks ‘what is the problem’ and ‘what … Continue reading Female State of the Nation: Part 1: Where are we?

The other half of the conversation: Osrin and daily violence

By Dela Gwala Last year, Tim Osrin made the Southern Suburbs of Cape Town infamous by attacking Cynthia Joni because he thought she was a sex worker. Five UCT students cemented this new found infamy by assaulting Delia Adonis on the pavements of Claremont. “ Racially-motivated” attacks is what the headlines cried. But in both these … Continue reading The other half of the conversation: Osrin and daily violence